Patience…

Patience alone can’t describe all the characteristics and deep meanings associated with the Turtle, however if the word Patience is analyzed in more depth, it will reveal a lot of the relative concepts which either they relies on it or completes their true meanings…

Turtle is a symbol of steadfastness and tranquility in religion, mythology, and folklore from around the world.  A tortoise’s longevity is suggested by its long lifespan and its shell, which was thought to protect it from any foe. In the creation myths of several cultures, the turtle or tortoise carries the world upon its back or supports the heavens. In Chinese tradition the creator goddess Nu Gua cuts the legs off a sea turtle and uses them to prop up the sky after Gong Gong destroys the mountain that had supported the sky. The flat undershell and round domed upper shell of a turtle resembles the ancient Chinese idea of a flat earth and round domed sky.  The World Turtle carries the Earth upon its back in myths from North America. In Cheyenne tradition, the great creator spirit Maheo kneads some mud he takes from a coot’s beak until it expands so much that only Old Grandmother Turtle can support it on her back. In Mohawk tradition, the trembling or shaking of the Earth is thought of as a sign that the World Turtle is stretching beneath the great weight that she carries.

In a story from Admiralty Island, people are born from eggs laid by the World Turtle. There are many similar creation stories throughout Polynesia.  Turtles and tortoises are incorporated into many religious traditions and mythologies around the world. In ancient Mesopotamia, the turtle was associated with the god Ea and was used on kudurrus as a symbol of Ea. Ijapa the tortoise is a trickster in a cycle of tales told by the Yoruba of Africa.  In Hindu mythology the world is thought to rest on the backs of four elephants, who stand on the shell of a turtle. In Hinduism, Akupara is a tortoise who carries the world on his back. It upholds the Earth and the sea. One avatar of Vishnu is said to be the giant turtle Kurma. The Sri Kurmam Temple in Andhra Pradesh, India is dedicated to the Kurma-avatar.

In China, the tortoise is one of the “Four Fabulous Animals”, the most prominent beasts of China. It is of the water element. The other animals are the tiger, phoenix, and dragon. These animals govern the four points of the compass, with the Black Tortoise the ruler of the north, symbolizing endurance, strength, and longevity. Along with the Tiger, they are the only two of the four that is a real animal.

Patience requires Stillness and inner-tranquility… it needs a state of total prejudicelessness… a mind without any preoccupations about anything… so that it wouldn’t judge and decide hastily… and many other things… I may add more through time… but all of these elements have a close relation with each other in that they both need and feed each other…

You can find a lot of information on the Internet about the symbolism of Turtle in Mythology, Religion and various cultures…

An interesting page is Tortoises, I-Ching and Magic Squares

And another quick searche returned this –> link… which has gathered interesting information about the Turtle symbol in one concise page.

A Light in the Darkness…

A Light in the Darkness / Ein Licht in der Dunkelheit

“Take a piece of glass, paint colours and forms on it, and put the same into a magic lantern, turn on a little light, and the  colours and the forms painted on the glass are reproduced on the screen. If that light were not turned on, you would not see  the colours of the slide on the screen.

“How are colours formed? By breaking up white light with a many-sided prism. So it is with a man’s character. It is seen when  the Light of Life (God) is shining through it, i.e. in a man’s actions. If the man is sleeping or dead, you do not see his  character. Only when the Light of Life is animating the character and causing it to act in a thousand different ways, in  response to its contact with this many-sided world, can you perceive a man’s character. If white light had not been broken up  and put into forms and shapes on our magic lantern slide, we should never have known that there was a piece of glass in front  of the light, for the light would have shone clearly through. In a sense that white light was marred, and had some of its clearness taken from it by having to shine through the colours on the glass.

“So it is with an ordinary man. His mind is like the screen. On it shines light, dulled and changed because he has allowed the  many-sided world to stand in the way of the Light (God) and broken it up. He sees only the effects of the Light (God) instead  of the Light (God) Himself, and his mind reflects the effects he sees just as the screen reflects the colours on the glass.  Take away the prism and the colours vanish, absorbed back into the white light from whence they came. Take away the colours  from the slide and the light shines clearly through. Take away from our sight the world of effects we see, and let us look only  into the cause, and we shall see the Light (God).

“A Master in meditation, though the eyes and ears be open, fixes his attention so firmly on ‘That which sees’ that he neither  sees nor hears, nor has any physical consciousness at all — nor mental either, but only spiritual.

“We must take away the world, which causes our doubts, which clouds our mind, and the light of God will shine clearly through.  How is the world taken away? When, for example, instead of seeing a man you see and say, ‘This is God animating a body’, which  body answers, more or less perfectly, to the directions of God, as a ship answers more or less perfectly to her helm.

———

A passage taken from the book “Ramana Maharshi and The Path of Self Knowledge”, by ARTHUR OSBORNE, from a letter written to a friend in London by F. H. Humphreys and published by her in the International Psychic Gazette, London.

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